News and Events

News and Events (87)

Advanced Power and Thermal Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson, AFB, Ohio

Community Fund small

Nashville, Tenn. – Barge Waggoner has awarded $17,500 in its latest round of Community Fund recipients. Eight organizations throughout the firm’s landscape were selected. Since its inception, the BWSC Community Fund has given out a total of 28 grants totaling $44,000.

The BWSC Community Fund was established by the employee body to assist in further creating a better life in our communities. This fund supports charitable organizations that promote the wellbeing of children, the elderly, and those in financial need. In addition it also recognizes those organizations that advance the interests of society in the areas of health and wellness, education, and workforce development. The Community Fund is administered by the Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee, an organization that offers personalized charitable solutions which keep costs low and effective.

Salvation Army Angel Tree - $4,000, Southeast Alabama Youth Services - $3,000, East Tennessee Children’s Hospital Hope Grant - $2,500, One Bistro of Miamisburg - $2,500, Lipscomb University’s Peugeot Center - $2,500, Alabama Rural Ministries of Auburn - $1,000, Red Bird Mission, Knox ProCorps - $1,000, The Wings of Hope Pediatric Foundation - $1,000.

Dayton, Ohio. – In conjunction with the Dayton Development Coalition (DDC), the Federal Program represented BWSC on a recent members-only tour of Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB). The tour included specialized briefings, which allowed our folks to learn invaluable information about the strategic mission of the largest tenant groups at WPAFB, including the Air Force Life Cycle Management Center (AFLCMC), POW/MIA Accounting Agency Lab, Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT), and the National Air and Space Intelligence Center (NASIC). The tour concluded with a special meet and greet with Colonel Jeffery J McGalliard, Commander of the 445th Airlift Wing, and a walkthrough of one of the organizations Air Force Reserve Command C-17 Globemaster III’s, tailnumber 0178.

 

00-DSCN3757

Pictured: ​Joe Bissaillon and Chris Brown (far right) are pictured with Dayton Development Coalition employees, members of private industry, and local government representative.

00-Riverwalk Buff

Knoxville, Tenn. – The City of Knoxville recently received a 70-acre donation of green space from the Legacy Parks Foundation. This donation moves a south Knoxville waterfront park closer to reality.

The Knoxville City Council approved a resolution Tuesday night to express deep appreciation. WBIR reports that Legacy Parks first bought the 70-acrea land, now called the River Bluff Wildlife Area, almost six years ago. Learn more about this potential park and its land usage.

This land offers one of the most spectacular views of Knoxville and is home to seasonally shifting beauty just minutes from downtown. Barge Waggoner donated master plan services to preserve Knoxville and celebrate the company’s local presence.

The objectives of the plan were to develop site modifications to interpret a historic civil war skirmish that took place on the property, develop a trailhead and node for the expansion of Knoxville’s greenway network, and plan passive park elements to provide an educational space embracing the natural beauty of the site.

Barge Waggoner brainstormed and developed several conceptual designs to include important elements such as civil war interpretation, hiking trails, a natural playground, an overlook structure, and fishing pier among other features.

The final master plan, completed in 2014, reflects the Legacy Parks Foundation and the City of Knoxville’s desire to limit development. Barge Waggoner kept the property as natural as possible, adding minimal infrastructure for visitors, providing safe access to its most prominent features, restoring habitat, and providing passive recreation opportunities for the community.

(Photo: WBIR)

00-CH-53k Maintenance Training Facility

Dayton, Ohio – Barge Waggoner, with its design-build partner Walbridge, is currently under contract with Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Mid-Altantic to design and construct a new CH-53K Maintenance Training Facility at MCAS New River, Camp Lejeune, North Carolina.

The facility will provide training space to support CH-53K maintenance personnel and will house several full size CH-53K mock-ups. It will also include classrooms, administration space, personnel support space, general offices, hydraulic/mechanical rooms, tool room, maintenance training areas, storage space, avionics, airframe, wire repair, and composite repair labs. Construction is scheduled for a June 2016 completion.

Sikorsky Aircraft Corp announced the successful first flight last week of the U.S. Marine Corps’ CH-53K King Stallion heavy lift helicopter prototype, known as Engineering Development Model-1 (EDM-1). The 30-minute flight signals the beginning of a 2,000-hour flight test program using four test aircraft. Sikorsky delivered the EDM-1 into the test program at the company’s West Palm Beach, Fla.-based Development Flight Center in late 2014. During its 30 minute maiden flight the EDM-1 aircraft performed hover, sideward, rearward and forward flight control inputs while in ground effect hover up to 30 feet above the ground.

The U.S. Department of Defense’s Program of Record remains at 200 CH-53K aircraft with a Initial Operational Capability in 2019. Eventual production quantities would be determined year-by-year over the life of the program based on funding allocations set by Congress and the U.S. Department of Defense acquisition priorities. The Marine Corps intends to stand up eight active duty squadrons, one training squadron.

 

00-HondurasBridge3

Nashville, Tenn. – Using your expertise in service of others can be a rewarding experience. Members of both Water Services and Land Resources have partnered with Lipscomb University through The Peugeot Center for Engineering Service to Developing Communities to perform that very task over 1400 miles from home.

In partnership with Honduras Outreach, Inc., students, faculty, and friends of Lipscomb University’s Raymond B. Jones College of Engineering, and The Peugeot Center, several BWSC staff members recently completed the installation of a 104 ft. bridge connecting two school campuses separated by a busy highway in San Esteban, Honduras. Nashville BWSC employees Dean Harrison, Kris Hatchell, and Ethan Johnson, traveled to San Esteban, equipped with countless hours of preparation.

Other BWSC team members that have participated in past Lipscomb projects and the San Esteban project were: Luke Burris, Ryan Taylor, Jimmy Wiseman, Will Brogley, Rick Forehand, Daniela Rodriguez, Patrick Stephens, Marris Jones, Landel Bilbrey

Learn more about the 104 ft. San Esteban bridge and its story. The Peugeot Center has six bridges left to build in Honduras, Haiti and Guatemala. Volunteers are always needed. Feel free to contact Caleb Meeks at Lipscomb or Kris Hatchell to learn how to get involved. Monetary donations are accepted as well.

The Raymond B. Jones College of Engineering and The Peugeot Center send multiple teams throughout the year to locations in Guatemala and Honduras, partnering with community development organizations in bridge and water projects. The university’s rich history of engineering missions meets various needs of international communities by using students and professionals to create innovative solutions. Learn more about The Raymond B. Jones College of Engineering and Peugeot Center: www.lipscomb.edu

steve fritts news

Knoxville, Tenn. – Steve Fritts has joined the newly-created Advocacy Board within the School of Landscape Architecture at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville.

The Advocacy Board is expected to focus specifically on the school’s development and advancement of landscape architecture. Fritts and other board members will strengthen ties between the program and the contemporary profession by understanding the current and projected needs, goals, and drivers of landscape architecture. They will also expand the reach and exposure of the University of Tennessee’s program through potential partnerships in such instances as recruiting, internships, and graduate placement.

As the firm’s Parks and Recreation discipline lead, Fritts’ career has been spent on the planning, development, and design of parks, recreation, trails, streetscapes, and tourism enhancement projects for communities of all sizes. He earned his Bachelor of Science in Ornamental Horticulture and Landscape Design from the University of Tennessee and Master of Landscape Architecture from Louisiana State University. He is a Registered Landscape Architect in seven states. A LEED Accredited Professional BD+C, Fritts is affiliated with the American Society of Landscape Architects, National Recreation and Park Association and Legacy Parks Foundation of Knoxville.

Fritts has sat on the Board of Trustees for the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) and is a former president and treasurer of the Tennessee Chapter.

Dayton Crew Photo1

Dayton, Ohio. – Knoxville, Columbus (Georgia), and Dayton staff that supported the Ft. Benning, Georgia Building 129 Supper Club Seating Expansion has hit a notable mark. The BWSC team prepared a design/build request for proposal including architectural, electrical, mechanical, fire suppression, and civil engineering. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Savannah District recently rated the BWSC team’s performance exceptional or very good in all evaluation categories including quality, schedule, and project management.

The Contractor Performance Assessment Reporting System (CPARS) is a web-enabled application used by the federal government to document architect/engineer and contractor performance information required by Federal Regulations (FAR Part 42). A/E performance is reviewed at least annually and at the time the work under contract or order is completed. A CPARS-system generated notification is sent to BWSC’s Federal Program leaders when an evaluation is ready for comment and the firm is given up to 14 calendar days to submit concurring comments or rebutting statements.

Federal agencies access and use the past performance information for architect/engineer and construction contracts from the last six years. BWSC strives for exceptional CPARS evaluations which are a critical component for the firm’s selection for future contract awards.

Nashville, Tenn. – Barge Waggoner employees Luke Burris, Ed Walker, and Larry Cato, took part in a groundbreaking ceremony for three projects associated with Hartsville’s new 1-MGD SBR wastewater treatment plant on Monday, September 14.

Prior to the groundbreaking, the firm provided design and engineering services for upgrades to the existing treatment plant, upgrades to a sewer lift station, a new water booster pump station, 4 miles of 12-inch water line, and site development for the industrial park. Paul Bizier serves as Engineer of Record for the facility intended to provide improved wastewater treatment to existing customers and service for CCA’s Trousdale Correctional Facility. Barge Waggoner has provided services for this project since 2007.

The new $6.1 million wastewater treatment facility will be a renovation and expansion of the current site on Water Plant Road and is being financed through contributions from CCA, a Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development grant, a USDA Rural Development grant and loan, and loan obtained by the Utility District. Completion of the treatment plant is anticipated to last one year. The project includes construction of new headworks, SBRs with post-equalization, disc filters, and renovation of existing chlorine contact chamber. Existing aeration basins will be rehabilitated to provide aerobic digestion, and dewatering to be provided by a screw press.

 

Hartsville WWTP Groundbreaking IMG 1679 web

.

Pictured: Jerry Helm, General Manager of Hartsdale-Trousdale Water & Sewer Utility District; Carroll Carman, County Mayor; Bobby Goode, State Director for USDA Rural Development; Penny Sutherland, Operations Manager of Hartsdale-Trousdale Water & Sewer Utility District; Bill Scruggs, Superintendent of Roads; Kerry Smith and Joe Smith of Smith Contractors; Vance Hamilton of USDA Rural Development; Terri Lynn Weaver, State Representative; Diane Black, U.S. Representative; Hattie McDonald, President of Water Board; Toby Woodmere; Secretary of Water Board; Phyllis Shoulders, Commission at Large.

 

Bat close

Nashville, Tenn. – Barge Waggoner has recently started providing a new service that will support upcoming projects requiring clearance for potential adverse impacts to federally-listed bat species.

Angel Fowler and Mike Williams with Environment & Water Resources staff worked diligently in the month of August to survey for the federally-threatened northern long-eared bat (Myotis septentrionalis) and the federally-endangered Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis) necessary for the completion of several upcoming transportation projects. After three rounds of rabies vaccines, they were ready for a few weeks of nocturnal work.

Consultation and mitigation approaches for impacts to Indiana bats from federal projects vary greatly across the 22 states of the bat’s range, and those approaches have been rapidly changing in recent years. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Consultation/Coordination approaches are likely to continue to evolve in response to the spread of white-nose syndrome across the species’ range. These variations and changes have caused uncertainty, conflict, delays, and large workloads for the Service, Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), and especially in the state Departments of Transportation.

In June 2015, the northern long-eared bat (NLEB) was added to the USFWS list of endangered species. The NLEB’s range overlaps with the Indiana bat but is even more extensive and covers all or portions of 37 states; for Tennessee, this includes every county. Therefore, consultation issues similar to those experienced with the Indiana bat are expected.

“Both species hibernate in caves during the winter, but there is a small survey window during the summer (typically May 15th to August 15th) in which these species utilize cavities and/or dead portions of trees for roosting purposes,” says Angel Fowler. “Because many projects require the removal of potential roosting habitat for these listed species, the USFWS generally requires a presence/absence survey during the summer roosting season for the consideration of necessary conservation and mitigation measures under the Endangered Species Act if it is determined either species is present within the proposed project footprint.”

With BWSC’s recently awarded TDOT On-call Ecology contract and the increased demand by our internal business units on natural resources work, there has become a growing demand for bat habitat studies and bat (mist netting) surveys. “An important aspect to consider is the requirements necessary for surveying for these species,” says Mike Williams. “These surveys can only be conducted by an experienced professional with an issued Recovery Permit from the USFWS authorizing activities with specific listed species, and the agency is very strict when issuing these permits, especially for bats, because of the extensive handling that is required. An individual applying for a permit must have a couple of years of experience handling and identifying bat species, and must have references to support the experience.”

Although natural resources staff members do not have a permit to survey for federally listed bat species, Mike and Angel are working to obtain experience so they can use it to support a permit application when they do have the credentials to apply. Fowler stated, “We hired Dr. Brian Carver through ResourceTek who has a permit to conduct these surveys, and are working closely with him so we can work towards having a permit of our own in the future. We are very grateful to have someone who is willing to help BWSC provide this service to our clients as we continue to expand our natural resources practice area.”

 

Bat pic MikeWilliams     IMGP2369

 

[Top: Williams holds a federally-threatened northern long-eared bat (Myotis septentrionalis)]

[Bottom Left: Williams processing an eastern red bat (Lasiurus borealis)]

[Bottom Right: Fowler holding a year-round cave dweller, the federally endangered gray bat (Myotis grisescens)]

01-Bob USAF

Nashville, Tenn. – President and Chief Executive Officer Bob Higgins will be honored by the Nashville Business Journal at its inaugural 2015 Veterans Awards.

The Nashville publication recognized individuals that are military veterans who have served their country and are now impacting Nashville's business community. The winners were nominated by the public and scored by a panel of judges on a variety of factors, including professional accomplishments and community involvement. The complete list of honorees has been released.

Prior to attending college, Bob served in the U.S. Air Force as a Computer Systems Control Specialist with a tour of duty during Desert Shield/Storm.

In this quick clip, Bob shares the most valuable thing he learned from his time serving in the military.

Page 4 of 7



News and Events

News and Events (87)

Advanced Power and Thermal Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson, AFB, Ohio

Community Fund small

Nashville, Tenn. – Barge Waggoner has awarded $17,500 in its latest round of Community Fund recipients. Eight organizations throughout the firm’s landscape were selected. Since its inception, the BWSC Community Fund has given out a total of 28 grants totaling $44,000.

The BWSC Community Fund was established by the employee body to assist in further creating a better life in our communities. This fund supports charitable organizations that promote the wellbeing of children, the elderly, and those in financial need. In addition it also recognizes those organizations that advance the interests of society in the areas of health and wellness, education, and workforce development. The Community Fund is administered by the Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee, an organization that offers personalized charitable solutions which keep costs low and effective.

Salvation Army Angel Tree - $4,000, Southeast Alabama Youth Services - $3,000, East Tennessee Children’s Hospital Hope Grant - $2,500, One Bistro of Miamisburg - $2,500, Lipscomb University’s Peugeot Center - $2,500, Alabama Rural Ministries of Auburn - $1,000, Red Bird Mission, Knox ProCorps - $1,000, The Wings of Hope Pediatric Foundation - $1,000.

Dayton, Ohio. – In conjunction with the Dayton Development Coalition (DDC), the Federal Program represented BWSC on a recent members-only tour of Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB). The tour included specialized briefings, which allowed our folks to learn invaluable information about the strategic mission of the largest tenant groups at WPAFB, including the Air Force Life Cycle Management Center (AFLCMC), POW/MIA Accounting Agency Lab, Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT), and the National Air and Space Intelligence Center (NASIC). The tour concluded with a special meet and greet with Colonel Jeffery J McGalliard, Commander of the 445th Airlift Wing, and a walkthrough of one of the organizations Air Force Reserve Command C-17 Globemaster III’s, tailnumber 0178.

 

00-DSCN3757

Pictured: ​Joe Bissaillon and Chris Brown (far right) are pictured with Dayton Development Coalition employees, members of private industry, and local government representative.

00-Riverwalk Buff

Knoxville, Tenn. – The City of Knoxville recently received a 70-acre donation of green space from the Legacy Parks Foundation. This donation moves a south Knoxville waterfront park closer to reality.

The Knoxville City Council approved a resolution Tuesday night to express deep appreciation. WBIR reports that Legacy Parks first bought the 70-acrea land, now called the River Bluff Wildlife Area, almost six years ago. Learn more about this potential park and its land usage.

This land offers one of the most spectacular views of Knoxville and is home to seasonally shifting beauty just minutes from downtown. Barge Waggoner donated master plan services to preserve Knoxville and celebrate the company’s local presence.

The objectives of the plan were to develop site modifications to interpret a historic civil war skirmish that took place on the property, develop a trailhead and node for the expansion of Knoxville’s greenway network, and plan passive park elements to provide an educational space embracing the natural beauty of the site.

Barge Waggoner brainstormed and developed several conceptual designs to include important elements such as civil war interpretation, hiking trails, a natural playground, an overlook structure, and fishing pier among other features.

The final master plan, completed in 2014, reflects the Legacy Parks Foundation and the City of Knoxville’s desire to limit development. Barge Waggoner kept the property as natural as possible, adding minimal infrastructure for visitors, providing safe access to its most prominent features, restoring habitat, and providing passive recreation opportunities for the community.

(Photo: WBIR)

00-CH-53k Maintenance Training Facility

Dayton, Ohio – Barge Waggoner, with its design-build partner Walbridge, is currently under contract with Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Mid-Altantic to design and construct a new CH-53K Maintenance Training Facility at MCAS New River, Camp Lejeune, North Carolina.

The facility will provide training space to support CH-53K maintenance personnel and will house several full size CH-53K mock-ups. It will also include classrooms, administration space, personnel support space, general offices, hydraulic/mechanical rooms, tool room, maintenance training areas, storage space, avionics, airframe, wire repair, and composite repair labs. Construction is scheduled for a June 2016 completion.

Sikorsky Aircraft Corp announced the successful first flight last week of the U.S. Marine Corps’ CH-53K King Stallion heavy lift helicopter prototype, known as Engineering Development Model-1 (EDM-1). The 30-minute flight signals the beginning of a 2,000-hour flight test program using four test aircraft. Sikorsky delivered the EDM-1 into the test program at the company’s West Palm Beach, Fla.-based Development Flight Center in late 2014. During its 30 minute maiden flight the EDM-1 aircraft performed hover, sideward, rearward and forward flight control inputs while in ground effect hover up to 30 feet above the ground.

The U.S. Department of Defense’s Program of Record remains at 200 CH-53K aircraft with a Initial Operational Capability in 2019. Eventual production quantities would be determined year-by-year over the life of the program based on funding allocations set by Congress and the U.S. Department of Defense acquisition priorities. The Marine Corps intends to stand up eight active duty squadrons, one training squadron.

 

00-HondurasBridge3

Nashville, Tenn. – Using your expertise in service of others can be a rewarding experience. Members of both Water Services and Land Resources have partnered with Lipscomb University through The Peugeot Center for Engineering Service to Developing Communities to perform that very task over 1400 miles from home.

In partnership with Honduras Outreach, Inc., students, faculty, and friends of Lipscomb University’s Raymond B. Jones College of Engineering, and The Peugeot Center, several BWSC staff members recently completed the installation of a 104 ft. bridge connecting two school campuses separated by a busy highway in San Esteban, Honduras. Nashville BWSC employees Dean Harrison, Kris Hatchell, and Ethan Johnson, traveled to San Esteban, equipped with countless hours of preparation.

Other BWSC team members that have participated in past Lipscomb projects and the San Esteban project were: Luke Burris, Ryan Taylor, Jimmy Wiseman, Will Brogley, Rick Forehand, Daniela Rodriguez, Patrick Stephens, Marris Jones, Landel Bilbrey

Learn more about the 104 ft. San Esteban bridge and its story. The Peugeot Center has six bridges left to build in Honduras, Haiti and Guatemala. Volunteers are always needed. Feel free to contact Caleb Meeks at Lipscomb or Kris Hatchell to learn how to get involved. Monetary donations are accepted as well.

The Raymond B. Jones College of Engineering and The Peugeot Center send multiple teams throughout the year to locations in Guatemala and Honduras, partnering with community development organizations in bridge and water projects. The university’s rich history of engineering missions meets various needs of international communities by using students and professionals to create innovative solutions. Learn more about The Raymond B. Jones College of Engineering and Peugeot Center: www.lipscomb.edu

steve fritts news

Knoxville, Tenn. – Steve Fritts has joined the newly-created Advocacy Board within the School of Landscape Architecture at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville.

The Advocacy Board is expected to focus specifically on the school’s development and advancement of landscape architecture. Fritts and other board members will strengthen ties between the program and the contemporary profession by understanding the current and projected needs, goals, and drivers of landscape architecture. They will also expand the reach and exposure of the University of Tennessee’s program through potential partnerships in such instances as recruiting, internships, and graduate placement.

As the firm’s Parks and Recreation discipline lead, Fritts’ career has been spent on the planning, development, and design of parks, recreation, trails, streetscapes, and tourism enhancement projects for communities of all sizes. He earned his Bachelor of Science in Ornamental Horticulture and Landscape Design from the University of Tennessee and Master of Landscape Architecture from Louisiana State University. He is a Registered Landscape Architect in seven states. A LEED Accredited Professional BD+C, Fritts is affiliated with the American Society of Landscape Architects, National Recreation and Park Association and Legacy Parks Foundation of Knoxville.

Fritts has sat on the Board of Trustees for the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) and is a former president and treasurer of the Tennessee Chapter.

Dayton Crew Photo1

Dayton, Ohio. – Knoxville, Columbus (Georgia), and Dayton staff that supported the Ft. Benning, Georgia Building 129 Supper Club Seating Expansion has hit a notable mark. The BWSC team prepared a design/build request for proposal including architectural, electrical, mechanical, fire suppression, and civil engineering. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Savannah District recently rated the BWSC team’s performance exceptional or very good in all evaluation categories including quality, schedule, and project management.

The Contractor Performance Assessment Reporting System (CPARS) is a web-enabled application used by the federal government to document architect/engineer and contractor performance information required by Federal Regulations (FAR Part 42). A/E performance is reviewed at least annually and at the time the work under contract or order is completed. A CPARS-system generated notification is sent to BWSC’s Federal Program leaders when an evaluation is ready for comment and the firm is given up to 14 calendar days to submit concurring comments or rebutting statements.

Federal agencies access and use the past performance information for architect/engineer and construction contracts from the last six years. BWSC strives for exceptional CPARS evaluations which are a critical component for the firm’s selection for future contract awards.

Nashville, Tenn. – Barge Waggoner employees Luke Burris, Ed Walker, and Larry Cato, took part in a groundbreaking ceremony for three projects associated with Hartsville’s new 1-MGD SBR wastewater treatment plant on Monday, September 14.

Prior to the groundbreaking, the firm provided design and engineering services for upgrades to the existing treatment plant, upgrades to a sewer lift station, a new water booster pump station, 4 miles of 12-inch water line, and site development for the industrial park. Paul Bizier serves as Engineer of Record for the facility intended to provide improved wastewater treatment to existing customers and service for CCA’s Trousdale Correctional Facility. Barge Waggoner has provided services for this project since 2007.

The new $6.1 million wastewater treatment facility will be a renovation and expansion of the current site on Water Plant Road and is being financed through contributions from CCA, a Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development grant, a USDA Rural Development grant and loan, and loan obtained by the Utility District. Completion of the treatment plant is anticipated to last one year. The project includes construction of new headworks, SBRs with post-equalization, disc filters, and renovation of existing chlorine contact chamber. Existing aeration basins will be rehabilitated to provide aerobic digestion, and dewatering to be provided by a screw press.

 

Hartsville WWTP Groundbreaking IMG 1679 web

.

Pictured: Jerry Helm, General Manager of Hartsdale-Trousdale Water & Sewer Utility District; Carroll Carman, County Mayor; Bobby Goode, State Director for USDA Rural Development; Penny Sutherland, Operations Manager of Hartsdale-Trousdale Water & Sewer Utility District; Bill Scruggs, Superintendent of Roads; Kerry Smith and Joe Smith of Smith Contractors; Vance Hamilton of USDA Rural Development; Terri Lynn Weaver, State Representative; Diane Black, U.S. Representative; Hattie McDonald, President of Water Board; Toby Woodmere; Secretary of Water Board; Phyllis Shoulders, Commission at Large.

 

Bat close

Nashville, Tenn. – Barge Waggoner has recently started providing a new service that will support upcoming projects requiring clearance for potential adverse impacts to federally-listed bat species.

Angel Fowler and Mike Williams with Environment & Water Resources staff worked diligently in the month of August to survey for the federally-threatened northern long-eared bat (Myotis septentrionalis) and the federally-endangered Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis) necessary for the completion of several upcoming transportation projects. After three rounds of rabies vaccines, they were ready for a few weeks of nocturnal work.

Consultation and mitigation approaches for impacts to Indiana bats from federal projects vary greatly across the 22 states of the bat’s range, and those approaches have been rapidly changing in recent years. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Consultation/Coordination approaches are likely to continue to evolve in response to the spread of white-nose syndrome across the species’ range. These variations and changes have caused uncertainty, conflict, delays, and large workloads for the Service, Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), and especially in the state Departments of Transportation.

In June 2015, the northern long-eared bat (NLEB) was added to the USFWS list of endangered species. The NLEB’s range overlaps with the Indiana bat but is even more extensive and covers all or portions of 37 states; for Tennessee, this includes every county. Therefore, consultation issues similar to those experienced with the Indiana bat are expected.

“Both species hibernate in caves during the winter, but there is a small survey window during the summer (typically May 15th to August 15th) in which these species utilize cavities and/or dead portions of trees for roosting purposes,” says Angel Fowler. “Because many projects require the removal of potential roosting habitat for these listed species, the USFWS generally requires a presence/absence survey during the summer roosting season for the consideration of necessary conservation and mitigation measures under the Endangered Species Act if it is determined either species is present within the proposed project footprint.”

With BWSC’s recently awarded TDOT On-call Ecology contract and the increased demand by our internal business units on natural resources work, there has become a growing demand for bat habitat studies and bat (mist netting) surveys. “An important aspect to consider is the requirements necessary for surveying for these species,” says Mike Williams. “These surveys can only be conducted by an experienced professional with an issued Recovery Permit from the USFWS authorizing activities with specific listed species, and the agency is very strict when issuing these permits, especially for bats, because of the extensive handling that is required. An individual applying for a permit must have a couple of years of experience handling and identifying bat species, and must have references to support the experience.”

Although natural resources staff members do not have a permit to survey for federally listed bat species, Mike and Angel are working to obtain experience so they can use it to support a permit application when they do have the credentials to apply. Fowler stated, “We hired Dr. Brian Carver through ResourceTek who has a permit to conduct these surveys, and are working closely with him so we can work towards having a permit of our own in the future. We are very grateful to have someone who is willing to help BWSC provide this service to our clients as we continue to expand our natural resources practice area.”

 

Bat pic MikeWilliams     IMGP2369

 

[Top: Williams holds a federally-threatened northern long-eared bat (Myotis septentrionalis)]

[Bottom Left: Williams processing an eastern red bat (Lasiurus borealis)]

[Bottom Right: Fowler holding a year-round cave dweller, the federally endangered gray bat (Myotis grisescens)]

01-Bob USAF

Nashville, Tenn. – President and Chief Executive Officer Bob Higgins will be honored by the Nashville Business Journal at its inaugural 2015 Veterans Awards.

The Nashville publication recognized individuals that are military veterans who have served their country and are now impacting Nashville's business community. The winners were nominated by the public and scored by a panel of judges on a variety of factors, including professional accomplishments and community involvement. The complete list of honorees has been released.

Prior to attending college, Bob served in the U.S. Air Force as a Computer Systems Control Specialist with a tour of duty during Desert Shield/Storm.

In this quick clip, Bob shares the most valuable thing he learned from his time serving in the military.

Page 4 of 7